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    eng 3

     
     
    English III is a required course for high school graduation. Students in English III analyze United States literature as it reflects social perspective and historical significance by continuing to use language for expressive, expository, argumentative, and literary purposes. The empshasis in English III is critical analysis of texts through reading, writing, speaking, listening, and using media. In addition, students will:
    • Relate the experiences of others to their own
    • Research the diversity of American experience
    • Examine relationships between past and present
    • Build increasing sophistication in defining issues and using argument effectively
    • Create products and presentations that maintain standard conventions of written and oral language
     

    Common Core Essential State Standards

     

     

    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

     

    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors).

     

     

    • Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics.

     

    • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

     

     

    • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

     

    • Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational US documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features.

     

     

    • Write informative/expository texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

         a. Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information so that each new element builds on that which precedes it to create a unified whole; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

         b. Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting the most significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.

         c. Use appropriate and varied transitions and syntax to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts.

         d. Use precise language, domain-specific vocabulary, and techniques such as metaphor, simile, and analogy to manage the complexity of the topic.

         e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

         f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

     

    • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

     

    • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

     

     

    • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

         a. Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

         b. Apply grades 11-12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal US texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in US Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents] and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy [e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]”).

     

    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

         a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.

         b. Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

         c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

         d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

     

     

     

    Outline by Quarter

     

    1st Quarter…Native American Influence and The Puritans

     

    Time Frame

    Readings

    wk.1-wk.4

    “The Earth on Turtle’s Back”

     

    “When Grizzlies Walked Upright”

     

    The Iroquois Constitution

     

    Rez Life

     

    “Native American Mascots, Honor or Racism”

    wk. 5-wk.6

    Captivity Narrative of Mary Rowlandson

     

    Selections from present day captivity narratives

     

    Puritan Poetry by Anne Bradstreet and others

     

    Sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”

    wk.7-wk.9

    The Crucible

     

     

    2nd Quarter…The Colonials, the Revolution, and the Nineteenth Century

     

    Time Frame

    Readings

    wk.1

    Early national literature

     

    Poor Richard’s Almanak

     

    Autobiography of Ben Franklin

    wk.2-wk.3

    Founding documents / speeches

     

    The Declaration of Independence

     

    Patrick Henry’s address to the Virginia Convention

    wk.4-wk.6

    The Devil and Tom Walker

     

    Edgar Allan Poe short stories and poems

    wk.7

    Transcendentalism

     

    Excerpt from Walden and Walden on Wheels

     

    Emily Dickinson

    wk.8-wk.9

    Moby Dick

     
     

     

     
    Focus for 1st Quarter

     

    Writing/Grammar Skills

     

    • Memoirs
    • Proofing & Self-Editing
    • Subject-Verb, Pronoun Agreement
    • Capitalization/Punctuation
    • Tense
    • Run-ons/Fragments
    • Parallel Structure

     

    Reading Comprehension/Vocabulary Skills

     

    • Read, listen and view expressive texts
    • Main Idea/Supporting Details
    • Vocabulary Strategies
    • Purpose/Audience/Context
    • Fact/Opinion
    • Text components
    • Make connections between works and self
    • Anglo-Saxon/Greek/Latin Bases & Affixes

     

    Literary Analysis Skills

     

    • Reflect/Respond Expressively to Texts for Multiple Perspectives
    • Develop Thematic Connections Among Works & Genres
    • Comparative Analysis
    • Assess Logic of Argument in Public & Political Documents
    • Interpret Meanings for Audiences

     

    Oral/Presentational/Technology Skills

     

    Present Reflection with Social, Historical, Cultural Influences