Pat Crowley and RJR football team members
 

 There is a somewhat major conflict "brewing" concerning Hanes Park...and it involves supporters of RJR athletic teams and folks in the surrounding area that created the "Save Hanes Park" organization.  This conflict showed up at a meeting on June 15th at Wiley Middle School, where plans were presented for the future renovation of the park.  To read this front-page article from our local newspaper, click here ( * ).  (This may take a minute or so to load).
 
Concerning Hanes Park, and what entities control what takes place there, and what gets constructed or renovated there:
* To read the legal document that specifies what entities control what happens at Hanes Park, Click here ( * ).
The bottom-line of this document clearly states that only two entities control what takes place at Hanes Park:
                  * the Winston-Salem / Forsyth County School Board
                  * the Winston-Salem City Council.
If there is a disagreement between these two entities, the City Council has the final say-so.
Hence, groups that support RJR (such as the "Bring It Home" / "RJ Reynolds Home Field Advantage" organization, as well as the neighborhood groups such as the"Save Hanes Park" organization, can supply input to the School Board and City Council, but they have no direct say-so in what takes place at Hanes Park.
* Concerning what gets built and renovated at Hanes Park:  the Park is in a flood plain.  Click here ( * ) and here ( * ) to see the two flood plain maps associated with the Park.  Many thanks go to Keith Huff (Stormwater / Erosion Control Director for the City of Winston-Salem) for the following information concerning this:
Floodplain ordinances (see below) require that encroachments greater than 50% can only be approved via a certified engineering study. Simply put, the engineer must determine the effects of the proposed development on the existing floodplain (both upstream and downstream). The Federal Government has a standard for how this study must be conducted (60.3 of the CFR).

2-3.2   SPECIFIC STANDARDS

In all special flood hazard areas where base flood elevation (BFE) data has been provided, as set forth in Section C.2-1.6 or Section C.2-3.4, the following provisions, in addition to the provisions of Section C.2-3.1, are required:

(A) Limits of Encroachment

(1) Encroachments which include fifty percent (50%) or less of the area of the floodway fringe on the zoning lot where such encroachments are located, and which do not extend toward the stream channel more than one-half (½) the distance between the outer edge of the floodway fringe and the outer edge of the floodway at any point, may be approved without a certified engineering study, provided the encroachment meets all other standards of this Ordinance.

(2) Encroachments which include more than fifty percent (50%) of the area of the floodway fringe on the zoning lot where such encroachments are located, and/or which extend toward the stream channel more than one-half (½) the distance between the outer edge of the floodway fringe and the outer edge of the floodway at any point may only be approved if a certified engineering study demonstrates that such encroachments result in no more than a one-half foot rise in flood elevation.

(3) Encroachments into the floodway fringe resulting from utilities maintenance projects, or greenway projects identified in the "Greenway Plan" or other plans or policies adopted by the City-County Planning Board, Winston-Salem City Council and/or the Forsyth County Board of Commissioners, may exceed the one-half (½) foot rise in elevation if said project also meets the requirements of Section C.2-3.6(A)(2).

(4) Measurement of the fifty percent (50%) area and one-half distance of floodway fringe encroachment are calculated from each outside edge of the floodway to the edge of the floodway fringe.

(B) Residential Construction .....New construction and substantial improvement of any residential structure (including manufactured homes) shall have the reference level, including basement, elevated no lower than the regulatory flood protection elevation, as defined in Section C.2-1.4 of this Chapter.

(C) Nonresidential Construction .....New construction and substantial improvement of any commercial, industrial, or other nonresidential structure shall have the reference level, including basement, elevated no lower than the regulatory flood protection elevation, as defined in Section C.2-1.4 of this Chapter. Structures located in A, AE, AO, and A1-30 Zones may be floodproofed to the regulatory flood protection elevation in lieu of elevation provided that all areas of the structure, together with attendant utility and sanitary facilities, below the regulatory flood protection elevation are watertight with walls substantially impermeable to the passage of water, using structural components having the capability of resisting hydrostatic and hydrodynamic loads and the effect of buoyancy. For AO Zones, the floodproofing elevation shall be in accordance with Section C.2-3.7(B). A registered professional engineer or architect shall certify that the floodproofing standards of this subsection are satisfied. Such certification shall be provided to the Floodplain Administrator as set forth in Section C.2-2.4, along with the operational plan and the inspection and maintenance plan.

Hence, the bottom-line of all of this:   it takes a report from a certified engineer telling (the Federal Government) how any renovations or new construction at Hanes Park will affect the water-flow (in a flood situation).  These reports typically cost about $14,000.
 
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